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Friday, July 17, 2020 | History

1 edition of Cotton production and water quality found in the catalog.

Cotton production and water quality

Cotton production and water quality

an initial assessment

  • 301 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Resources and Technology Division, ERS-NASS [distributor in [Washington, DC], Rockville, MD .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cotton -- United States.,
  • Water quality -- United States.,
  • Agricultural chemicals -- Environmental aspects -- United States.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementStephen R. Crutchfield ... [et al.].
    SeriesStaff report -- AGES 9105., ERS staff report -- no. AGES 9105.
    ContributionsCrutchfield, Stephen R., United States. Dept. of Agriculture. Economic Research Service. Resources and Technology Division.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationv, 47 p. :
    Number of Pages47
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14680054M

    Each step of the clothing production process carries the potential for an environmental impact. For example, conventionally grown cotton, one of the most popular clothing fibers, is also one of the most water- and pesticide-dependent crops (a view disputed by Cotton Incorporated, a U.S. cotton growers' group).Cited by: the cotton industry in Kansas has a direct output of over $ million. Through indirect and induced impacts, the industry creates a total economic contribution of approximately $ million. Cotton production and ginning in Kansas has exceeded million bales since Significant infrastructure investments.

    The textile industry consumes a substantial amount of water in its manufacturing processes used mainly in the dyeing and finishing operations of the plants. The wastewater from textile plants is classified as the most polluting of all the industrial sectors, considering the volume generated as well as the effluent composition [ 15 - 17 ]. In Cited by:   Striving toward sustainable cotton production and improved water quality. Proc. of the Beltwide Cotton Conferences, measured aqueous and sediment quality in runoff from conventional till, no till, cover crop cotton production. Water quality varied vastly and toxicity was reduced in cover crop field plots at Judd Hill Plantation.

    Cotton production is a water-intensive business. The global average water footprint of cotton fabric is 10, litres per kilogram. That means that one cotton shirt of grams costs about litres. A pair of jeans of grams will cost litres. Lower Humidity for Improved Lint Quality Water is supplied to the cotton crop root and not to the canopy, as in the case of sprinkler irrigation systems. This keeps the humidity levels unaffected. This is significant when the first-floor bolls open. Lower the humidity conditions, better is the lint quality! Cultivating the Right Cotton Plant.


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Cotton production and water quality Download PDF EPUB FB2

Cotton Production and Water Quality: Economic and Environmental Effects of Pollution Prevention [US Department of Agriculture (USDA)] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This document is part of the United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Rural Development Publications collection.

cotton production, but doing so could reduce cotton yields and raise cotton prices. The same level of water. quality improvement could be achieved at less cost by targeting the chemical use or erosion restrictions only to.

cotton farms with the most vulnerable soils. Cotton production and water quality: economic and environmental effects of pollution prevention. [Stephen R Crutchfield; United States. Department of Agriculture. The global water footprint related to the consumption of cotton products is estimated at Gm3/year, which is 43 m3/year per capita in average.

About 42% of this footprint is due to the use of blue water, another 39% to the use of green water and about 19% to the dilution water requirements (Table 12).File Size: 1MB. understanding of water use in the production of cotton in India, one of the world’s primary cotton farming areas and a country that experiences water scarcity and degraded water quality.

It supports C&A’s aims to reduce the water footprint of cotton to levels at or below sustainability benchmarks. cotton production systems.

Although rainfall across the US Cotton Belt ranges from 60 inches per year in the humid Southeast to less than 10 inches in the arid Southwest (Figure 1), supplemental irrigation is prac-ticed across the entire Cotton Belt. How Cotton Plants Use Water Cotton, like all land plants, must maintain enough water in its cellsFile Size: KB.

The amount of water needed to produce one kilogram of cotton; equivalent to a single t-shirt and pair of jeans. Cotton is the most widespread profitable non-food crop in the world.

Its production provides income for more than million people worldwide and employs almost 7% of all labor in developing countries. Currently the fashion industry and the textile market consider organic cotton to be the highest order of sustainability.

The global production of organic cotton is % of global cotton production (Blackburn, ) and water issues and labour are not completely tackled by the standards and regulatory by: 5. Producing 1kg of cotton in India consu litres of water, on average, according to research done by the Water Footprint Network.

In other words, t litres of water cannot be used. Chapter 1* - AN INTRODUCTION TO WATER QUALITY *This chapter was prepared by M. Meybeck and R. Helmer Characterisation of water bodies Water bodies can be fully characterised by the three major components: hydrology, physico-chemistry, and biology.

A complete assessment of water quality is based on appropriate monitoring of these. Comprehensive, current, and written by leading experts, Water Quality & Treatment: A Handbook on Drinking Water, Sixth Edition covers state-of-the-art technologies and methods for water treatment and quality control.

Significant revisions and new material in this edition reflect the latest advances and critical topics in water supply and by: Get this from a library.

Cotton production and water quality: an initial assessment. [Stephen R Crutchfield; United States. Department of Agriculture. Economic Research Service. Resources and Technology Division.;]. Impacts are typically cross-border. About 84% of the water footprint of cotton consumption in the EU25 region is located outside Europe, with major impacts particularly in India and Uzbekistan.

Given the general lack of proper water pricing mechanisms or other ways of transmitting production-information, Cited by: Purchase Water Quality Indices - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBNCotton’s average irrigation requirement is megalitres per hectare (ML/ha) (source: Crop and Pasture Science ).

This compares to the average water use of rice (ML/ha), fruit and nut trees ( ML/ha) and vegetables for human consumption (4 ML/ha) (source: ABARES).

Cotton Classification refers to the application of official cotton standards and standardized procedures developed by USDA for measuring those physical attributes of raw cotton that affect the quality of the finished product and/or manufacturing efficiency.

Cotton Production › Cotton Quality › Cotton Standards Websites Cotton Standards Overview The purpose of standards is to create a universal system for measuring — in this case, the quality of cotton fiber and textile products.

IV WATER REQUIREMENTS OF SELECTED INDUSTRIES purposes, not only for current operation demands but also for possible future expansion. It is obvious, therefore, that an ade­ quate supply of suitable water is of primary importance in the lo­ cation of new plants. As the industrial development of the countryCited by: 5.

Not only does modern cotton production strive to conserve water – it also preserves water quality by reducing fertilizer and pesticide runoff. No-till cotton protects both ground and surface water resources (Smith and Johnson, ), while precision ag and nutrient management technologies help growers apply inputs much more efficiently.

Farmer’s Handbook on Basic Agriculture. comply with high production and quality standards required by the importing countries. judicious use of natural resources such as soil and water, and emphasizing the importance of mechanization in the field of agriculture.

Cotton's water requirement is determined by the location and environment where it is being grown. The dryer and hotter the environment, the more water the plant requires. A desert-like environment with high temperatures and low humidity will result in high water requirements ranging from 40 to 50 inches of water per year.All the environmental spheres, such as air, water and soil, are seriously affected by the textile manufacturing processes from fiber production to final fabric finishing.

Consequently, a number of initiatives are introduced in textile industry by the public and private partnership to enhance the environment-friendly nature of textile : Faheem Uddin.

By rethinking water consumption at every step of its production process, Levi Strauss & Co is using up to 96% less water to produce a new line of jeans.